NYSACC Welcomes Peter Young

Peter A. Young, Chairman of the Town of Southold Conservation Advisory Council in Suffolk County was elected to the NYSAAC Board at our New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Conference in Albany on October 25, 2019. Peter has retired from careers in corporate real estate and military service.  He is a graduate of Fordham University (BS) and the University of California, Berkeley, (MBA).  He has served as a member of the Putnam County Soil and Water Conservation District, the Town of Philipstown Wetlands Advisory Committee, Chairman of the Philipstown Planning Board and as the Putnam County representative to the Hudson Valley Greenway Council before relocating to a family home in the hamlet of Mattituck. He is a member of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, the Peconic Bay Power Squadron (Senior Navigator) and a New York State Boating Instructor. Welcome aboard, Peter!

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Ask NYSACC

Ask NYSACC is a new feature in which NYSACC fields reader questions on a variety of topics.  We seek expert responses to your questions from environmental professionals.  If you have a question, please email NYSACC’ President at SimonSkolnik@gmail.com. Question #1  I have observed fire trucks filling up at dry standpipes at various lakes and other water sources around my town and then discharging that water elsewhere, either at a scene or in training.  Usually at a scene this is less of an issue if the water is being discharged to a structure or field, but that can still get to a nearby waterway.  For training they usually just discharge right back into the lake they are standing at.  Sometimes that discharge flows directly into another lake.  We have begun to see invasive plant species (e.g., water chestnut) and possibly animal species (e.g., zebra mussels) showing up in lakes which are disconnected from other contamination sources and the only consistent, potential source we can identify is fire trucks emptying their water trucks. For example, at a local park, the lake there is invested with water chestnut.  This was brought to the attention of our local PRISM in 2018. The PRISM investigated and

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