A Very Fond Farewell and Welcome!

Dear Friends, It has been one of the greatest honors of my life to serve as the President of NYSACC for the last 30 years.  I want to welcome Simon Skolnik, Chair of the Town of Bedford Conservation Board and former NYSACC Vice President, into his new position as President of our fine organization.  For 25 years, he has been my steadfast supporter.  We are lucky to have him, with his fresh ideas and clear vision for NYSACC.  He will bring us a wonderful Conference this year in Westchester.  The NYSACC Board of Directors has bestowed upon me the honorable title of President Emeritus.  I am glad to continue in this new role. I’ve become sentimental about my time with NYSACC, especially as I look over old editions of NYSACC News.  Here, you can see my first President’s Message, from January 1990. I was surprised to read that many of the environmental issues that plagued New York State in 1990 remain equally concerning today.  But now we have added a bigger issue: climate change.   Our country isn’t where I’d like it to be environmentally, and I wish we were making a positive impact on the world’s environment.  We must

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CAC/CB Annual Education Credits

Many of you are familiar with educational credits required by the state for members of regulatory commissions, such as planning boards and zoning boards of appeal.   ELLA works with agencies like the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation to provide credit-based workshops whenever possible and hopes to renew its Conservation Accreditation Program (CAP) in the future.  We all know the responsibility we have been given by our own municipalities to submit the best scientific information we can provide to assist them in making decisions on matters of great importance.  Having a system in which we can maintain a level of education, be it voluntary or mandatory, would be a tremendous asset for our groups.  If you are interested in learning more about this program, please contact  nysaccofficemanager@gmail.com.

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Environmental Leaders Learning Alliance: A program of Teatown Lake Reservation

The Environmental Leaders Learning Alliance (ELLA), first introduced in 2007, was relaunched in 2019.  The Alliance currently brings together members of 22 municipal conservation commissions from the lower Hudson Valley that serve as advisors to town councils, planning boards and zoning commissions on critical land use decisions and other important environmental matters. ELLA provides a much-needed mechanism for improving communication between municipalities on regional environmental issues that cross political boundaries.  The more knowledgeable Alliance members become in relevant technical matters and best management practices, the more effective they will be at guiding their town’s zoning and permitting officials and policy decision-makers. Bringing a broad range of expertise, ELLA members are provided a forum to share their experiences and learn from each other in order to create lasting change. Members participate in quarterly training workshops, share lessons learned, and build inter-municipal solutions to regional environmental issues. Teatown Lake Reservation, in partnership with Pace University and the Federated Conservationists of Westchester County, serves as the convener and administrator of ELLA.  With its unique team learning approach, the Environmental Leaders Learning Alliance aims to positively influence future environmental decisions in the Hudson Valley, and to become a model for other regional networks throughout

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Focus on Nature Centers Throughout NYS

The content of this article was reprinted with the permission of Teatown Lake Reservation. Teatown is a 1000-acre nature preserve and education center located in the Lower Hudson Valley, whose mission is to inspire their community to lifelong environmental stewardship.  They are located at 1600 Spring Valley Rd., Ossining, NY 10562. The Preserve & Hiking Trails Teatown manages a 1,000-acre preserve (the largest community-supported preserve in Westchester County). 15 miles of trails are open to the public from dawn til dusk, 365 days a year. The preserve also includes Wildflower Island, a 2-acre wildflower sanctuary. Education 20,000+ individuals are impacted by their environmental education programs each year. Education efforts include a wide range of classes, lectures, and outdoor activities, on-and offsite, for students, families, adults, and under-resourced communities, all focused on nature and the role of stewardship in preserving biodiversity. Science & Stewardship The mission of their science and stewardship efforts is to preserve the region’s biodiversity. They tackle local and regional conservation issues through habitat protection and restoration, wildlife management, research and monitoring, and regional collaboration. Regional Collaboration Teatown works with several regional partnerships including the Environmental Monitoring and Management Alliance, the Lower Hudson Partnership for Regional Invasive Species

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