Meet our new interns

One of the goals NYSACC has set for itself this year is to locate all active CAC’s in New York State. While we are a member financed association, that hasn’t stopped us from contacting non-members and offering any help and assistance they might need. There is no source for this list, other than NYSACC. So, it was with great appreciation that two students have volunteered to work together and contact every municipality in the state to find out if they have a CAC. This master list will be used to send out our quarterly newsletters. We also would like to share this list with the DEC, as they from time to time organize regional meetings of CACs. Knowing the name and location of CACs will provide us with information on the health and well-being of environmental review within the state. Finally, getting nearby CACs to know each other can only help in getting their work done. And we will make this list public on our website.   We’d like to introduce you to these two fine individuals: My name is Brisa and I am a rising senior in High School at Millennium Brooklyn. I love being outdoors as much as

Read more

Focus on a CAC

NYSACC would like to offer its members the opportunity to share with us the things they’ve done and provide us with information we can use. To start the ball rolling, the Town of Bedford Conservation Board presents a few of the things it cares about. Short Description of Bedford The town, composed of three hamlets, Bedford Hills, Bedford Village, and Katonah, is 39.42 square miles, with a population of 17,755 (2018). Although its location is about 40 miles north of New York City, it’s not your typical bedroom community. About 60% of its land is open space (having two NYC reservoirs, one nearly completely in Bedford, does help), and its history is quite unique. Founded in 1680, as a town in Connecticut, it was transferred to New York in a boundary dispute, settled by King William III of England. The town served as the county seat of Westchester County during the American Revolutionary War, until Bedford Village was burned by the British in July 1779. Bedford Village was rebuilt, and is now a national historic district. John Jay, the first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, retired to Bedford, and his home, the Jay Homestead, is a historic state park.

Read more